WORKSHOP: Designing Computational Economics Experiments: An Ongoing Experience

WORKSHOP: Designing Computational Economics Experiments: An Ongoing Experience

Kevin McCabe, Prof of Economics, Law & Neuroscience, George Mason University; Sarah Sylvester, George Mason UniversityTrack 5 GAME/INSTRUCTION DESIGN

Kevin McCabe
Prof of Economics, Law & Neuroscience
George Mason University

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Sarah Sylvester
George Mason University

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In this talk the presenters will give a post mortem on their experience teaching undergraduate board game design using the "Values at Play" framework, originally developed by Mary Flanagan and Helen Nissenbaum for digital games.

After briefly introducing the framework, they will discuss the curriculum used and their modifications to extend it and translate for analog games. Using examples from the course they will investigate what succeeded, what failed, and what improvements could be made. The overall premise of the "Values at Play" framework is that games impact our collective social ethics, and we aim to contribute to and further this endeavor through sharing our experience and key takeaways for attendees.

Attendees will leave the session with several tips for running their own versions of the "Values at Play" curriculum, including: team formation strategies, issue selection strategies, modifications to the reading list, and an updated suggested game play list. The latter two items will be provided as a handout for attendees.

Additionally, the presenters will discuss several pitfalls of our course, such as: students' struggling to connect mechanics and values, disconnects between designer concept and player interpretation, and difficulty acquiring a deep understanding of some social and political issues. For each, possible solutions or workarounds to these challenges will be proposed." In this presentation we will share our own takeaways from our experience designing and teaching this course. Attendees will leave the session with several tips for running their own versions of the "Values at Play" curriculum, including: team formation strategies, issue selection strategies, modifications to the reading list, and an updated suggested game play list. The latter two items will be provided as a handout for attendees. Additionally, the presenters will discuss several pitfalls of our course, such as: students' struggling to connect mechanics and values, disconnects between designer concept and player interpretation, and difficulty acquiring a deep understanding of some social and political issues. For each, possible solutions or workarounds to these challenges will be proposed.

Fri 12:00 am - 12:00 am
GAME / INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN